Contact our Georgia national whistleblower lawyers today. Call us at 770-643-1606

Hospice to pay $1.75 million to resolve false claims act allegations

The USDJ Northern District recently published the below. See a portion below: 

ATLANTA – STG Healthcare of Atlanta, Inc. (“STG Healthcare”) and two of its senior executives, Paschal “Pat” Gilley and Mathew Gilley, have agreed to pay $1.75 million to resolve allegations that STG Healthcare, operating as Interim Healthcare of Atlanta, submitted or caused the submission of false claims to Medicare and Medicaid for patients who were not eligible for the hospice benefit and that resulted from STG Healthcare’s provision of unlawful payments to a referring physician in violation of the Anti-Kickback Statutes.

“Hospice is not a blank check for unscrupulous medical providers willing to admit patients who are not terminally ill,” said U.S. Attorney Byung J. “BJay” Pak.  “It is reserved for those who truly need it.  We will also continue to prioritize cases where it appears that a medical decision, especially the decision to forego curative treatment, has been influenced by a kickback.”

“When healthcare providers put their financial interests above the needs of patients the federal funds are diverted from where they are truly needed, putting our most vulnerable citizens at risk,” said Chris Hacker, Special Agent in Charge of FBI Atlanta. “The message is clear; the FBI will not tolerate companies who file false claims to generate more corporate revenue and take advantage of programs like Medicare & Medicaid.”

“As more Americans choose hospice care, more government funding is being provided to this critical service. Unfortunately, scammers are seizing an opportunity to steal precious funding by enrolling ineligible patients in hospice care,” said Derrick Jackson, Special Agent in Charge for the Office of Inspector General of the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services.  “With our law enforcement partners, we will continue to protect patients and the programs on which they depend.”

“The hospice benefit provided by Medicaid is especially reserved for terminally ill Georgians at a critical time of transition in their care,” said Attorney General Chris Carr.  “Our office is proud to have worked alongside the U.S. Attorney’s Office for the Northern District of Georgia in this effort, and we will continue to ensure the hospice benefit is not exploited and abused by health care providers to the detriment of Georgia taxpayers.”

The Medicare and Medicaid hospice benefit is available for patients who elect palliative treatment (medical care focused on providing patients with relief from pain, symptoms, or stress) for terminal illness and who have a life expectancy of six months or less if their illness runs its normal course.  Before billing government healthcare programs, a hospice provider must comply with Medicare and Medicaid’s requirements and ensure that patients who are foregoing curative care are in need of end-of-life care.

Whistleblowerlaw.com & Mike Bothwell Lawfirm does not claim or imply ownership of this article. 

Full article link here: https://www.justice.gov/usao-ndga/pr/hospice-pay-175-million-resolve-false-claims-act-allegations

Throw Out Your Assumptions About Whistleblowing

Harvard Business Review recently published the below. See a portion below: 

Whistleblowing stories are all over the news. Some observers have attributed this to a systemic change in society. There are more stories about whistleblowing, the argument goes, because there are more crimes to report.

However, rather than an increase in criminal activity, we may instead be observing an increase in the willingness of employees to speak up. Consider the dramatic increase in claims of sexual harassment in 2017 as the #MeToo movement gained momentum. Was this a sudden increase in harassment, or an increased willingness to speak up about problems that have been ongoing for years?

Our research on employee whistleblowing, using previously unavailable data, shows for the first time that we may be in the golden age of accountability systems. In 2018, NAVEX Global, the leading provider of employee hotline and incident management systems, provided us secure, anonymized access to more than 2 million internal reports made by employees of more than 1,000 publicly traded U.S. companies.

Our study of the data led us to two important findings: First, whistleblowers are crucial to keeping firms healthy. The average manager seems to take these reports seriously and uses them to learn of and address issues early, before they evolve into larger, more costly problems. We also found that second hand reports are more credible and more valuable, on average, than firsthand reports.

Based on our research we’ve identified three lessons for leaders on effectively managing whistleblower systems.

View the 3 lessons and read full article here.

Whistleblowerlaw.com & Mike Bothwell Lawfirm does not claim or imply ownership of this article. 

Full article link here: https://hbr.org/2020/01/throw-out-your-assumptions-about-whistleblowing

Justice Department Recovers over $3 Billion from False Claims Act Cases in Fiscal Year 2019

Justice department logo

The United States Justice Department recently published the below article. See a portion below: 

The Department of Justice obtained more than $3 billion in settlements and judgments from civil cases involving fraud and false claims against the government in the fiscal year ending Sept. 30, 2019, Assistant Attorney General Jody Hunt of the Department of Justice’s Civil Division announced today.  Recoveries since 1986, when Congress substantially strengthened the civil False Claims Act, now total more than $62 billion.

“The significant number of settlements and judgments obtained over the past year demonstrate the high priority this administration places on deterring fraud against the government and ensuring that citizens’ tax dollars are well spent,” said Assistant Attorney General Hunt.  “The continued success of the department’s False Claims Act enforcement efforts are a testament to the tireless efforts of the civil servants who investigate, litigate, and try these important cases as well as to the fortitude of whistleblowers who report fraud.”

Of the more than $3 billion in settlements and judgments recovered by the Department of Justice this past fiscal year, $2.6 billion relates to matters that involved the health care industry, including drug and medical device manufacturers, managed care providers, hospitals, pharmacies, hospice organizations, laboratories, and physicians.  This is the tenth consecutive year that the department’s civil health care fraud settlements and judgments have exceeded $2 billion.  The amounts included in the $2.6 billion reflect only federal losses, but in many of these cases the department was instrumental in recovering additional millions of dollars for state Medicaid programs.

In addition to combating health care fraud, the False Claims Act serves as the government’s primary civil tool to redress false claims for federal funds and property involving a multitude of other government operations and functions.  The Act helps to protect our military and first responders by ensuring that government contractors provide equipment that is safe, effective, and cost efficient; to protect American businesses and workers by promoting compliance with customs laws, trade agreements, visa requirements, and small business protections; and to protect other critical government programs ranging from the provision of disaster relief funds to farming subsidies.

In 1986, Congress strengthened the Act by increasing incentives for whistleblowers to file lawsuits alleging false claims on behalf of the government.  These whistleblower, or qui tam, actions comprise a significant percentage of the False Claims Act cases that are filed.  If the government prevails in a qui tam action, the whistleblower, also known as the relator, typically receives a portion of the recovery ranging between 15 and 30 percent.  Whistleblowers filed 633 qui tam suits in fiscal year 2019, and this past year the department recovered over $2.1 billion in these and earlier filed suits.

Health Care Fraud

The department investigates and resolves matters involving a wide array of health care providers, goods, and services.  The department’s health care fraud enforcement efforts not only recover money for federal health care programs, such as Medicare, Medicaid, and TRICARE, but also help deter fraud schemes that put patients at risk and increase health care costs.

Reflecting the department’s commitment to holding drug companies accountable for their role in the opioid crisis, two of the largest recoveries involving the health care industry this past year came from opioid manufacturers.  In one matter, as part of a global resolution of criminal and civil claims, Insys Therapeutics paid $195 million to settle civil allegations that it paid kickbacks to induce physicians and nurse practitioners to prescribe Subsys for their patients.  The kickbacks allegedly took the form of sham speaker events, jobs for the prescribers’ relatives and friends, and lavish meals and entertainment.  The government also alleged that Insys improperly encouraged physicians to prescribe Subsys for patients who did not have cancer, and lied to insurers about patients’ diagnoses to ensure payment by federal healthcare programs.  In another matter, Reckitt Benckiser Group plc paid a total of $1.4 billion to resolve criminal and civil liability related to the marketing of the opioid addiction treatment drug Suboxone, which is a formulation of the opioid buprenorphine.  As part of the resolution, RB Group paid $500 million to the United States to resolve civil allegations that it directly or through subsidiaries promoted Suboxone to physicians who were writing prescriptions for uses that were unsafe, ineffective, and medically unnecessary; promoted Suboxone Film using false and misleading claims that it was less susceptible to diversion, abuse, and accidental pediatric exposure than other buprenorphine products; and took steps to delay the entry of generic competition in order to improperly control pricing of Suboxone.

The department also pursued other cases involving drug manufacturers.  For example, Avanir Pharmaceuticals paid over $95 million to resolve allegations that it paid kickbacks and engaged in false and misleading marketing to induce healthcare providers in long term care facilities to prescribe the drug Neudexta for behaviors commonly associated with dementia patients, which is not an approved use of the drug.  The department also continued to investigate efforts by drug manufacturers to facilitate increases in drug prices by funding the co-payments of Medicare patients.  Congress included co-pay requirements in the Medicare program, in part, to serve as a check on health care costs, including the prices that pharmaceutical manufacturers can demand for their drugs.  This year, seven drug manufacturers – Actelion Pharmaceuticals US Inc., Amgen Inc., Astellas Pharma US Inc.Alexion Pharmaceuticals, Inc., Jazz Pharmacueticals Inc., Lundbeck LLC, and US Worldmeds LLC – paid a combined total of over $624 million to resolve claims that they illegally paid patient copays for their own drugs through purportedly independent foundations that the companies in fact treated as mere conduits.

The department also reported substantial recoveries involving a variety of other healthcare providers.  Pathology laboratory company Inform Diagnostics, formerly known as Miraca Life Sciences Inc., paid $63.5 million to resolve allegations that it paid kickbacks to referring physicians in the form of subsidies for electronic health records (EHR) systems and free or discounted technology consulting services.  Greenway Health LLC, an EHR software vendor, paid over $57 million to resolve allegations that it misrepresented the capabilities of its EHR product “Prime Suite” and provided unlawful remuneration to users to induce them to recommend Prime Suite to prospective new customers.  Encompass Health Corporation (formerly known as HealthSouth Corporation), the nation’s largest operator of inpatient rehabilitation facilities (IRFs), paid $48 million to resolve allegations that some of its IRFs provided inaccurate information to Medicare to maintain their status as an IRF and to earn a higher rate of reimbursement, and that some admissions to its IRFs were not medically necessary.

Recoveries in Whistleblower Suits

Of the $3 billion in settlements and judgments reported by the government in fiscal year 2019, over $2.1 billion arose from lawsuits filed under the qui tam provisions of the False Claims Act.  During the same period, the government paid out $265 million to the individuals who exposed fraud and false claims by filing these actions.

The number of lawsuits filed under the qui tam provisions of the Act has grown significantly since 1986, with 633 qui tam suits filed this past year – an average of more than 12 new cases every week.

“Whistleblowers continue to play a critical role identifying new and evolving fraud schemes that might otherwise remain undetected,” said Assistant Attorney General Hunt.  “Taxpayers have benefitted greatly from these individuals who are often required to make substantial sacrifices to bring these schemes to light.”

In 1986, Senator Charles Grassley and Representative Howard Berman led the successful efforts in Congress to amend the False Claims Act to, among other things, encourage whistleblowers to come forward with allegations of fraud.  In 2009 and 2010, further improvements were made to the False Claims Act and its whistleblower provisions.  Congress also included in the False Claims Act authority for the government to dismiss cases that do not advance the goal of fraud prevention, and during the past year the government made increasing use of this tool to help prioritize and protect the expenditure of government resources.

Finally, Assistant Attorney General Hunt expressed appreciation for the many dedicated public servants throughout the department’s Civil Division and the U.S. Attorneys’ Offices, as well as the agency Offices of Inspector General and the many other federal and state agencies that contributed to the department’s False Claims Act recoveries this past fiscal year.

“The accomplishments announced today reflect the extraordinary efforts of the men and women throughout the government committed to protecting the federal fisc and the integrity of the government’s programs,” said Assistant Attorney General Hunt.  “Having served many years in the Civil Division, I have witnessed the passion and dedication of the talented employees who have committed their careers to serving the American people and defending the interests of our great nation.”

 

Whistleblowerlaw.com & Mike Bothwell Lawfirm does not claim or imply ownership of this article. Full article link here: https://www.justice.gov/opa/pr/justice-department-recovers-over-3-billion-false-claims-act-cases-fiscal-year-2019

Judge v. Jury: $350 Million Medicare Award at Stake in Atlanta

Whistleblower attorney Mike Bothwell was a tops quoted source in the article below:

Full Article Link

The invalidation of a Florida jury’s nearly $350 million Medicare fraud verdict wasn’t only frustrating for whistleblower Angela Ruckh and her attorneys. It may have also seriously hurt plaintiffs’ ability to fight alleged fraud in the southeast U.S.

Ruckh Nov. 20 will urge the Eleventh Circuit in Atlanta to reinstate the award, which a district judge tossed after concluding she failed to satisfy U.S. Supreme Court standards for demonstrating materiality in a False Claims Act case. The federal government is supporting her appeal.

The judge misconstrued ample evidence of materiality, Ruckh says. Rejecting her appeal could do great harm to the ability of FCA whistleblowers and the federal government to raise a valid case, whistleblower attorneys say.

The decision by Judge Steven Merryday of the U.S. District Court for the Middle District of Florida “takes the most conservative and defense-oriented” view of Supreme Court standards for raising false claims cases, said Mike Bothwell of Bothwell Law Group P.C. in Roswell, Ga.

Prosecution of FCA cases will become “infinitely harder” if the U.S. Court of Appeals for the Eleventh Circuit affirms, he said.

In 2018, the U.S. recovered $2.8 billion from FCA cases, $2.5 billion of which came from cases involving the healthcare industry.

Ruckh convinced a jury in February 2017 that Medicare wouldn’t have paid Consulate Health Care, a nursing home services provider, if Medicare knew the truth about the Consulate’s practice of “ramping,” which misleads Medicare as to the necessity of services, and “upcoding” for services which led to overbilling.

Merryday tossed the verdict nine months later, ruling that the alleged misconduct wasn’t material to government payment decisions under the Supreme Court’s 2016 ruling in Universal Health Servs., Inc. v. United States ex rel. Escobar.

That is, Ruckh didn’t offer meaningful proof that Medicare’s knowledge of the disputed practices was consequential to payment decisions, Merryday concluded.

Medicare knew about the allegations and continued to pay anyway, he said.

“We don’t want every administrative failure by a contractor to be an FCA case, but when you have facts like these, where folks are receiving unnecessary services, how is that not leading to inflated, unnecessary claims,” said Pamela Coyle Brecht of Pietragallo Gordon Alfano Bosick & Raspanti LLP in Philadelphia.

“Medicare has a pay and chase system. The U.S. doesn’t examine every claim in real time. It is entitled to rely on the truthfulness of a claim submitted by a contractor, and then attempt to recoup fraudulent payments at a later date,” she said.

“It undermines the entire purpose of the FCA to say that payments to a contractor, that turn out to be fraudulent, require dismissal of cases for lack of materiality,” she said.

Consulate says materiality was indeed lacking because Ruckh offered no evidence that Medicare had overlooked any alleged deficiencies in audits before deciding to continue paying.

“If the government thought the alleged violations were material, why would they keep paying the claims? There are a host of cases now where the government ‘knowledge’ defense has been successfully raised,” said Aaron Danzig of Arnall Golden Gregory LLP in Atlanta.

‘Wild, Wild West’

The verdict should be reinstated because Ruckh introduced more than enough evidence to show that higher therapy levels lead to increased payments, and using false therapy codes has a natural tendency to influence payments, her brief says.

The U.S. Justice Department supports Ruckh, stating in a brief that materiality for her claims is “obvious,” and that “it is difficult to see how any reasonable jury could have concluded otherwise.”

Brecht said it’s “currently the wild, wild west with regard to the materiality defense, and I would hope that the Supreme Court would shed more light on this issue.”

“There are many reasons why the government would continue to pay a contractor that don’t have to do with excusing fraud,” Brecht said.

More litigation will result if the Eleventh Circuit affirms, “because whistleblowers will be forced to get more aggressive in discovery,” Brecht said. “They will be forced to say I need to know more about what the government knew about defendants’ practices and when it knew it.”

Defendants naturally will be pleased if Merryday’s ruling is affirmed.

But in the event the Eleventh Circuit sides with Ruckh, the silver lining for defendants could come in the form of another materiality case working its way back to the high court’s door.

Several defendants since Escobar have unsuccessfully petitioned the Supreme Court to adopt a clear “no harm, no foul” rule with regard to continued payments. There can’t be any fraud if the government knows but pays, the petitions have argued.

Merryday’s opinion cited one of those continued payment cases, United States ex rel. Harman v. Trinity Indus. Inc.

The Fifth Circuit ruled in that case that a $663 million jury verdict couldn’t stand because the Federal Highway Administration always paid for and approved of a highway guardrail contractor’s product despite knowledge of alleged wrongdoing.

To contact the reporter on this story: Daniel Seiden in Washington at dseiden@bloomberglaw.com

To contact the editors responsible for this story: Jo-el J. Meyer at jmeyer@bloomberglaw.com; Patrick L. Gregory at pgregory@bloomberglaw.com

Whistleblowerlaw.com & Mike Bothwell Lawfirm does not claim or imply ownership of this article. Full article link here: https://news.bloomberglaw.com/federal-contracting/judge-v-jury-350-million-medicare-award-at-stake-in-atlanta

Trump & our thoughts on why we should protect Whistleblowers

USA Today recently published the following article “Trump’s allies want to ID the whistleblower, who may learn the price of speaking out“.

Here are our my thoughts.

Shortly after signing the Declaration of Independence, the Continental Congress passed a resolution for whistleblower protection.  Some sailor and marines blew the whistle on a commander of the navy during the war with Great Britain.  They reported the problems to the Continental Congress and were prosecuted for it.  The Continental Congress not only passed the resolution supporting blowing the whistle on such abuse (calling it a “duty”), but it passed a subsequent resolution to pay the costs of their defense.

Another major whistleblower legislation was passed in 1863 during the Civil War.  The False Claims Act also known as the Lincoln Law allowed private citizens to sue on behalf of the government to recover for false claims and fraud against the government.  This law was significantly revised in 1985 and has become the government’s number one tool for prosecuting fraud against the United States.  Whistleblowers recover from 15% to 30% of what the government receives and cases under the False Claims Act have brought in $60 billion since it was revamped in 1985.

Various state and federal agencies have passed whistleblower protections and evinced a consensus that whistleblowers play a crucial role in ferreting out fraud, waste, and abuse in our system.  In 1985, when Congress was considering one of the oldest and most robust whistleblower statutes (the False Claims Act), it noted that the act was underutilized in large part because of fear of retaliation.  That is perhaps the number one deterrent to people shinning a light on corruption and illicit dealings.  From July 30, 1778 to the present, America has agreed to protect people who are willing to bring bad things to light.

We absolutely need to continue this protection. I’m fighting for this daily.

Beaumont To Pay $84.5 Million To Settle False Claims Act In Federal Whistleblower Case

Bothwell Law Group filed a case that aided whistleblowers in the reporting of fraudulent activity by William Beaumont Hospital in Detroit, Michigan. The hospital agreed to pay an $84.5 million settlement to resolve allegations under the False Claims Act of improper relationships with eight referring physicians that led to the submission of false claims to the Medicare, Medicaid and the military Tricare programs.

Federal Whistleblower Attorney

If you have witnessed misuse, fraud or waste of government funds and feel compelled to do something about it, contact us at Bothwell Law Group at 770-643-1606.

Settlement Press Releases:

What Is a Qui Tam Medicare Lawsuit?

Understand the importance of a qui tam Medicare lawsuit.

Qui Tam Medicare LawsuitDo you know what constitutes a qui tam Medicare lawsuit? Medicare is a government-funded healthcare plan. It provides eligible citizens with affordable healthcare options. The system relies on honest workers and a reliable healthcare system to make sure it operates smoothly. However, not all healthcare workers play by the rules. And, if they defraud Medicare, they should expect to get caught and pay the price.

The Role of Private Citizens in a Qui Tam Lawsuit

Qui tam comes from a longer Latin phrase meaning, “as the king as well as himself.” This type of lawsuit allows citizens to pursue legal action on behalf of the government. Today, the majority of these lawsuits fall under the False Claims Act. The government passed this legislation to encourage citizens to come forward with information.

The term relator applies to those citizens who bring forth a qui tam lawsuit or whistleblowers. In the world of Medicaid fraud, whistleblowers play an important role in exposing and stopping criminal activity.

Common Types of Medicare Fraud

Those receiving care from a hospital, nursing home, or hospice should pay close attention to what goes on around them. Many reported Medicare fraud cases directly affect patients. Doctors may “over-diagnose” a patient to get a kickback from Medicare. Some healthcare works will even change a patient’s prescription to another drug for unethical reasons.

Patients may notice inconsistencies with their healthcare provider, but few report them. Many of the whistleblowers are actually employees. Here are some of the most common types of Medicare fraud reported:

  • Overcharging for procedures or charging for procedures never administered
  • Partially filling medications but billing for the full dosage
  • Raising prices for Medicare patients
  • Ordering unnecessary tests
  • Changing diagnostic codes
  • Falsifying a patient’s records to justify more costly treatments

Medicare fraud is very dangerous. It can significantly affect the quality of life for patients. This is especially true if the doctor prescribes drugs or treatments that are not medically necessary. Too many patients, however, don’t recognize the warning signs of fraud. Patients trust their doctors and healthcare workers to provide them with honest service. Unfortunately, Medicare fraud is more common than people realize. Some estimates report Medicare fraud affecting between 8% and 10% of claims.

Protections Provided to Relators with the False Claims Act

Speaking up about wrongdoings is the right thing to do, but many people are afraid to come forward. Those committing Medicaid fraud don’t want to get caught. The legal ramifications for cheating the government are very harsh. Guilty parties may find themselves serving time or paying a hefty fine.

When someone blows the whistle on Medicaid fraud, they’re putting themselves at risk. Those running the scheme may try to silence them. However, the False Claims Act helps to protect whistleblowers from retaliation. It makes it illegal to threaten, harass, suspend, or fire a relator. It’s important to note that each state imposes its own statute of limitations.

Money Awarded to Whistleblowers with the False Claims Act

Whistleblowers can expect to receive something in return for their help. Under the False Claims Act, they receive a percentage of the money the government is able to recover. Most of these awards fall between 15-30 percent of the settlement.

Depending on the size of the case, this can be a large amount of money. The total amount is also dependent on whether the government intervened in the case. It’s not uncommon for a whistleblower to receive millions of dollars for their help in cracking a Medicare fraud scheme.

With the risk of retaliation so high, even with protections in place, the monetary award is the only reason some relators speak up. Thanks to whistleblowers, the Department of Justice was able to recover over $2.5 billion in 2018. Without private citizens reporting tips, the majority of fraud cases would still go unnoticed.

The Role of a Lawyer in a Qui Tam Lawsuit

If you have information about possible Medicare fraud, the government wants you to report it to the Office of the Inspector General. While you may want to let everyone know, it’s best to keep it to yourself. You never know who you may upset in the process, and for your safety, you should stay anonymous for as long as possible.

Before reporting your tip, however, be sure to consult with a lawyer who handles whistleblower lawsuits. Your lawyer will do everything possible to protect your identity and make sure you get your full settlement. Never try to represent yourself. Contact the skilled qui tam Medicare attorneys at Bothwell Law Group by calling 770.643.1606 today.

How Prevalent Is Private Education Fraud?

Are the people in charge of your education guilty of private education fraud?

Recent events have brought to light the subject of private education fraud. While the sole purpose of any school is to educate, private schools also want to make money. Those we trust to educate our children may be engaging in fraudulent activities. Schools try to cover up illegal schemes. But, when the truth comes out, it becomes apparent how common fraud is in the private sector.

Education fraud is a hot topic this year. Several well-known schools are currently under investigation for admission fraud including Yale University and Stanford University, along with six others. The Department of Education oversees admission fraud cases. While these cases are still on-going, it has made the public fully aware of how prevalent fraud is in the education system.

Money: The Leading Cause of Fraud

As the saying goes, the love of money is the root of all evil. This is true in the education system. Schools rely on financial support to provide students with the best education possible. Unfortunately, some schools cross the line.

Schools may also mishandle how they report and spend their money. Administrators may lie about how much money the school makes in a year by deducting expenses that don’t exist and hiding funds. This is usually done to avoid paying taxes or to be eligible for additional funding. No matter the reason, this is a form of fraud.

Defrauding the Department of Education

Schools can also defraud the federal government. The government provides loans to many students attending private schools. The money received from these loans goes to fund the school where the student attends. If the school obtains these loans through devious methods, they’re defrauding the government. Taxpayers end up paying the bill for this illegal behavior.

Here are some ways a school may illegally obtain funds from federal loans:

  • Providing false information – to meet the conditions of a federal loan, a school may lie about certain aspects of their organization.
  • Failing to return funds – if a student withdraws, the school may withhold this information to avoid repaying any federal funds.
  • Illegally recruiting students – the school may provide an illegal incentive to a headhunter who can recruit the most students.
  • Lying about graduation and job placement – schools must provide accurate reports regarding their graduation and job placement rates. Falsifying this information is illegal.
  • Covering up academic eligibility – the school may lie about a student’s academic history to continue receiving funding.
  • Filling out loan applications without consent – it’s illegal for a school to fill out a federal loan application without informing the student.

This type of fraud usually begins at the top, and it requires the knowledge of many individuals to work. It’s often surprising to see how many people willingly participate in education fraud once a case becomes known to the public.

The Impact of Private School Education Fraud

While many people seem to think that private school education fraud only affects those who attend a specific school, they are wrong. Since this money often comes from the federal government, it’s really the taxpayers who lose. Unfortunately, schools go to great lengths to cover up this type of fraud. For this reason, many school administrators get away with participating in illegal activities.

The Department of Education investigates any reports of fraudulent activity. But, to begin an investigation, they need to know where to look. In many instances, they receive a tip from a local whistleblower. The department maintains a hotline for tips. They also provide outreach to help others understand how to identify education fraud. Anyone who has information about school fraud should consider informing the proper authorities.

What to Do if You Know About Fraud in Schools

It’s impossible to prosecute educational facilities if no one speaks out. Those involved keep their lips sealed. That’s why the Department of Education relies so heavily on the testimony of whistleblowers. It takes a lot of courage to come forward, but it’s always the right thing to do. When the case settles, you may also receive compensation for your efforts. Most whistleblowers can expect to receive 15-30 percent of the recovered money.

Before you tell your secret, find a lawyer who handles these types of cases. Retaliation is real, and you need to know your rights as a whistleblower. You need someone who knows how to keep you protected during the process. Find out more about private education fraud by contacting Bothwell Law Group online.